All posts in General

Tinnitus Week 2018 – February 5-11

Tinnitus Week 2018 – February 5-11

Tinnitus Week is taking place from 5-11 February

The aim of the week is to raise awareness of the condition, which affects approximately 1 in 10 of the population.

Raising awareness together

For the first time, the international tinnitus community will join forces to shine a light on the condition, targeting as many people as possible in order to raise awareness of how tinnitus impacts on the lives of those living with it.

This year, alongside the Tinnitus Research InitiativeTinnitus Hub and the American Tinnitus Association, we are giving Tinnitus Week a real international boost.  A new website has been set up, as a central resource collecting all the initiatives which will be taking place in 2018.

This website can be found at www.tinnitusweek.com.

They’ve been encouraging organisations, from across the world, who deal with tinnitus and other hearing-related issues such as hyperacusis and hearing loss, to work together to raise awareness of tinnitus during Tinnitus Week.

As such they’re hoping a large variety of activities will take place during the week across the globe, including local events, tinnitus information days, media interviews, science communication activities and much more.

If you will be doing anything during Tinnitus Week to help boost tinnitus awareness, please email join@tinnitusweek.com with the details and if suitable, these will be added to the Tinnitus Week site.

BTA plans

Here at the British Tinnitus Association, our campaign for the week will focus on children and young people.

The ‘Kids Talk Tinnitus’ campaign will engage with children, parents and schools to raise awareness of tinnitus amongst young people and drive the use of relevant support and resources


British Tinnitus Association reveals majority of UK parents are unaware children can have tinnitus

  • The British Tinnitus Association survey found just under a third of UK parents (32%) think children under the age of 10 can have tinnitus, and just 37% think it can affect children aged 10 to 16
  • The research, which coincides with Tinnitus Week (5-11 February 2018) and is part of the charity’s Kids Talk Tinnitus, also revealed many parents are unaware of the common signs of the hearing condition in children, such as anxiety or difficulty concentrating
  • To help tackle the problem, the charity has created guidance for both parents and teachers

Read more on this article on the British Tinnitus Association website

More

Nantwich Hearing Centre – Clinic Refurbishment.

Nantwich Hearing Centre – Clinic Refurbishment.

It is nearly 3 years since we opened Nantwich Hearing Centre. Our aim was and still is, to provide a range of services to local residents, focussed solely on maintaining and improving their hearing health.

Our intention was never to just sell people hearing aids, but to develop long term relationships with our customers, by offering an after care service that you just do not receive from major high street retailers.

The positive response to our services has been fantastic and we have now helped hundreds of people improve and protect their hearing for the future. We are very grateful to those first few customers who put their trust in a new business and to those who have recommended us to family and friends.

We remain passionate about our business and the importance of encouraging people to take care of their hearing. We are therefore looking to expand the range of services we offer and are delighted that from mid-January we will be able to offer Micro-suction Wax Removal.

In order to be able to provide Micro-suction to the very high standard that our customers would expect from Nantwich Hearing Centre, we need to invest in re-designing and re-fitting our clinic in the Cocoa Yard.

We will therefore be closed from 13th December until the New Year while the work takes place and the new equipment is installed. Upon completion our clinic will include a treatment room dedicated to wax removal, both micro-suction and irrigation, a separate consultation room with sound proof booth, for hearing assessments and general advice on hearing health and a newly refurbished reception / waiting area.

During this period our phone line will be diverted so you will still be able to call or reach us on e-mail or via the website. Please be assured that we have not disappeared, it might just take us a little longer to deal with your enquiry.

We thank you in anticipation of your patience and very much look forward to welcoming you to the ‘new look’ Nantwich Hearing Centre in January 18.

Kindest regards

Alan and Helen Jackson.

More

Enjoy more fun in and on the water with Alpine SwimSafe earplugs

For swimmers

Enjoy more fun in and on the water with Alpine SwimSafe earplugs. These special swimming hearing protectors prevent water getting into your ears, which can cause infections and swimmer’s ear. Thanks to the unique filters, you can still hear virtually everything. You can use SwimSafe earplugs while showering, swimming, or snorkeling, but they are also ideal for those participating in water sports. Many water sports fans wish to protect their ears against water and wind during (kite)surfing, sailing and wakeboarding. They wish to prevent an ear infection or surfer’s ear and to enjoy engaging in sport without painful ears. Pluggies Kids earplugs are available for children.

• Prevents water from penetrating your ear
• Protects against ear infection and surfer’s/swimmer’s ear
• Ambient sounds and conversation can still be heard
• Extremely comfortable AlpineThermoShape™ material
• Floating capacity
• No silicone
• Reusable

Earol® Swim prevents swimmers ear and trapped water

 

Earol® Swim prevents swimmers ear and trapped water. With Tea Tree Oil delivers a metered dose of a unique blend of Olive Oil & Tea Tree Oil into the outer ear finely coating the auditory canal creating a water resistant barrier.

 

For more information, contact us

 

 

 


For more info see the full article here http://www.justhear.co.uk/noise-and-leisure-hearing-products/earol-swimming-and-watersports.php

More

The Link Between Hearing and Dementia

The Link Between Hearing and Dementia

It is unlikely that anyone reading this post does not know someone suffering from, or affected by dementia. There are 1.2 million people in the UK (48 million worldwide) living with dementia. It is a far reaching disease which not only affects the individual, but all of their family, friends, and carers. Hearing loss has been identified as one of nine key modifiable factors that contributes to development of dementia.

Other factors were lack of education (8%), smoking (5%), failing to treat depression (4%), physical inactivity (3%), isolation (2%), high blood pressure (2%), obesity (1%), and type 2 diabetes (1%). The percentages are indications of how much of the risk each factor contributes, hearing loss carried the largest risk at 9%. These are all categorised as modifiable, as they can all be treated at least to some degree.

There are suggestions that hearing loss may add to the burden of a vulnerable brain, and increase the progression of dementia. Both hearing loss and dementia have been reported to cause increased social disengagement and depression, so may exacerbate or accelerate each other’s symptoms.

It is not yet completely clear whether the use of hearing aids and other instruments can prevent the onset of dementia. Hearing loss is known as a modifiable risk factor because it can be addressed and improved. Social isolation and depression contribute 6% of the modifiable dementia risk to potential cases, and hearing loss has long been known to cause both of these conditions. With this in mind, treating hearing loss, by default, often also takes care of two other major factors, and could potentially reduce dementia risk by 15%. Other risk factors could be addressed: by stopping smoking, keeping your mind agile, and regular exercise, and you could potentially negate most of the prospective 35% risk – vastly reducing the possibility of dementia onset.

Dementia is an unfortunate inevitability for many people. However disheartening this seems, to be able to potentially negate the effects of 35% of the risks puts us in a very strong position. Knowledge is always the first step towards a cure, and though currently all advice is only preventative, we are certainly heading in the right direction.

If you are worried about your hearing health in relation to dementia (or otherwise) and would like some advice, please do not hesitate to contact us for professional, friendly guidance.

Phone: 01270 611 212

Email: talktous@nantwichhearingcentre.co.uk


References:

Observed Hearing Loss and Incident Dementia in a Multiethnic Cohort

(Golub et al. 2017)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jgs.14848/full

 

Hearing loss as a risk factor for dementia: A systematic review

(Thomson et al 2017)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/lio2.65/full

 

Age-related hearing loss and dementia: a 10 year national population-based study

(Su et al. 2017)

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00405-017-4471-5

 

Dementia prevention, intervention, and care

(Livingston et al. 2017)

http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(17)31363-6.pdf

 

More

5 Things Treating Hearing Loss Says About You

5 Things Treating Hearing Loss Says About You

Treating Hearing Loss – What Does It Say About You?

Are you brushing off a hearing problem because you’re afraid it might say the wrong thing about you?  Well think again. Research shows that people with hearing loss who use hearing aids enjoy a better overall quality of life. In fact, you just may be surprised and inspired by these five things that treating hearing loss says about you.

You’re a go-getter

Research has found that people with hearing loss who use hearing aids are more likely to tackle problems actively. Addressing hearing loss shows self-assurance and a willingness to deal with issues head-on. Most hearing aid users in the workforce even say it has helped their performance on the job.

You value your relationships.

Healthy relationships rest largely on good communication. Treating hearing loss lets close family and friends know that you want to stay connected and involved in your relationships with them. Most people who currently wear hearing aids say it not only helps their overall ability to communicate effectively in most situations, but it also has a positive effect on their relationships. And they’re more likely to have a strong social network.

You like to be active.

If you enjoy an active lifestyle, you’re not going to let untreated hearing loss stop you. Treating hearing loss means you have every intention of keeping up the pace of a fulfilling life. In fact, people with hearing difficulty who use hearing aids get more pleasure in doing things and are even more likely to exercise and meet up with friends to socialise, research by the Better Hearing Institute (BHI) shows.

You love living life.

The more exuberance you have for life, the less likely it is you’ll let untreated hearing loss get in your way. When you address hearing loss, you let the world know you love living life, and you’re going to live it with gusto. Research even shows that people with hearing loss who use hearing aids are more likely to be optimistic and feel engaged in life.

You’re tech savvy and make the most of what modern life has to offer.

Sleek and cutting-edge, today’s wireless hearing aids are a front-runner in personal consumer electronics. At its best, technology offers solutions, enriches life, and makes us more efficient. Today’s modern hearing aids do all three. When you invest in your hearing health by using state-of-the-art hearing aids, you make it clear that you’re a present-day thought leader ready to reap the rewards that modern technology has to offer. It also means you’re up-to-date on the tremendous advances in hearing aid technology.


See more at: http://www.betterhearing.org/news/5-inspiring-things-treating-hearing-loss-says-about-you

More

A Specialist Centre For All Aspects Of Hearing Care

Hearing loss is one of the most common health issues in the world and is also one of the most treatable. Just as our eyesight deteriorates as we get older, hearing has its’ own natural aging process. In fact nearly one in five people age 12 and older, experience hearing loss severe enough to hinder communication.

Why live with hearing loss? Why feel frustrated, anxious and isolated? Even a minor loss can have a huge impact on our work, social and family lives. Asking people to repeat themselves or responding inappropriately draws more attention than wearing today’s stylish hearing aids.

More